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Understanding current approaches to the prevention of child sexual abuse in healthcare settings

18 September 2017

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse is to hold a two day seminar on 26 and 27 September to examine the prevention of child sexual abuse in healthcare settings.

Professionals from across the health sector will take part in discussions that will help the Inquiry understand the extent to which current practices protect children from being sexually abused and consider ways to ensure that children are better protected from sexual abuse in future.

The Inquiry has contacted health sector organisations across England and Wales seeking information and views about the steps they have taken to protect children from sexual abuse in recent years, the effectiveness of current child protection arrangements and what more can be done to protect children.  These views have now been compiled in a paper which will inform discussions at the seminar.

Representatives from a range of organisations, including NHS England, NHS Wales, the Care Quality Commission and the Royal College of Nursing will also participate in discussions at the seminar.

Topics to be discussed include culture and leadership, safe recruitment, training and whistleblowing policies.

The seminar will be live streamed and can be watched via this link www.iicsa.org.uk/live.

Inquiry Chair, Professor Alexis Jay OBE, said:

“This seminar will help the Inquiry understand whether current safeguarding measures within the health sector are effective in protecting children from sexual abuse.

“It will help us to formulate recommendations for change in this key area to ensure that children are better protected.”

This seminar is part of a series of research seminars being held by the Inquiry on a range of important topics.

The Inquiry also invites individual victims and survivors of child sexual abuse to consider sharing their experience through the Inquiry's Truth Project.

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